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“After an analysis of the first paragraph of Anne of Green Gables and its first few chapters, it is clear to see how the contrast between Green Gables and the town of Avonlea is developed throughout the beginning of the novel. Indeed, the Cuthberts and Anne face conflict on the basis that they’re dissimilar from other citizens. However, Marilla reveals to Matthew she has begun to enjoy Anne’s presence despite the accompanying struggles, implying perhaps, that the dissimilarity may not prove as unfavorable as it first seemed.”

Somewhere on the internet is the article that taught me this [almost] foolproof method of being prepared to write any essay conclusion paragraph. I’ll be explaining my own take on that article’s guidelines.

The above conclusion is the exact words I used for a Women’s and Gender Studies essay, on which I received a score of 97. That was the highest grade I had received on any college essay, so far as I can remember. That’s basically why I feel that “the power of indeed” is a worthy tool to remember and utilize in your essay-writing struggles endeavors.

“The power of indeed” should work for most basic essay prompts, especially those that require you to agree or disagree with a statement. The first step before even thinking about writing the conclusion is dissecting the prompt. The essay prompt for my Anne of Green Gables assignment was

Do a close reading of the novel’s first paragraph, and examine how the themes introduced in this paragraph are built upon throughout today’s reading. Questions to consider: How does this paragraph establish the character of the town (and specifically Rachel Lynde), as well as foreshadow the arrival of Anne? How are the contrasts that are drawn in this paragraph developed in the first 12 chapters?

In dissecting the prompt, we see it is asking the following questions: “What are the themes introduced in the first paragraph? How are they built upon in the rest of the reading? What is the character of the town/Rachel Lynde? How is the arrival of Anne foreshadowed?” If we read carefully, we understand that the last question about the contrasts drawn in the paragraph is asking the same thing as the first sentence of the prompt. That leaves you to answer the dissected questions. Unfortunately, I can teach you a writing template, but only you can provide the writing content. So, do your readings!

Next we have the actual template. There are four parts: (1) “After __ analysis of __”, (2) “it is clear to see __, (3) “indeed, __”, (4) filler/personal touch. We’ll address the parts in separate sections.

“After __ analysis of __”

Did you look at historical documents? The conclusion paragraph of a first chapter? A portfolio of an artist’s latest work? Whatever you looked at, figure out what to call it in at least three words, and that goes into the second blank. I read the first twelve chapters of Anne and paid special attention to the first paragraph. So far that makes my conclusion paragraph: “After __ analysis of the first paragraph of Anne of Green Gables and its first few chapters,”. I only say to make it at least three words in order to make the paragraph longer and sound more sophisticated. For example if I had read Hop on Pop, I wouldn’t just write, “After __ analysis of Hop on Pop” if I could instead write, “After __ analysis of the use of anapestic tetrameter in Hop on Pop of Dr. Seuss’s Beginner Book Series”, depending on the essay prompt. Err on the side of specific.

Finally the first blank can be filled with any words like “careful”, “critical”, or “thorough”. Or you could leave it blank as I did. Whichever sounds better in the sentence.

Example conclusion at this stage: “After careful analysis of the gender and class roles played by Mr. and Mrs. Darling of Peter Pan,”

“it is clear to see __”

Restate the prompt, in a way. My Anne prompt asked how the main themes are built upon in the reading. I basically wrote in my conclusion that the main themes are built upon in the reading: “it is clear to see how the contrast between Green Gables and the town of Avonlea is developed throughout the beginning of the novel.” This is the easiest part. Just make the prompt fit the sentence.

Example conclusion at this stage: “After careful analysis of the gender and class roles played by Mr. and Mrs. Darling of Peter Pan, it is clear to see how the characters reinforce or challenge such roles.”

“Indeed”

For this, restate your personal thesis. Give your answer to the prompt. Where the “it is clear to see __” stage is general, the “indeed, __” stage is detailed and has more substance to it, putting the prompt in the specific context of the readings/materials.

Example conclusion at this stage: “After careful analysis of the gender and class roles played by Mr. and Mrs. Darling of Peter Pan, it is clear to see how the characters reinforce or challenge such roles. Indeed, Mr. Darling appears to challenge gender roles while Mrs. Darling reinforces them, and both characters challenge class roles.”

Filler/personal touch

As the title suggests, add a personal flair. Maybe a sassy remark. Or a simple, general statement to tie the prompt into the rest of the reading.

Final conclusion: “After careful analysis of the gender and class roles played by Mr. and Mrs. Darling of Peter Pan, it is clear to see how the characters reinforce or challenge such roles. Indeed, Mr. Darling appears to challenge gender roles while Mrs. Darling reinforces them, and both characters challenge class roles. Their characterizations provide a glimpse into the adulthood to which Peter is terrified to commit.

I’ve written three essays using this method so far and they’ve all earned A’s. “The power of indeed” is no guarantee you’ll ace an essay, but it can’t hurt to always be prepared to at least have a solid conclusion.

Bonus tip: Yo, prospies, are you still struggling with your college essays? Our friends at InstaEDU are giving you the hookup: Chat with college counselors one-on-one and get the help you need. It’s like a private college consultant but without the $300/hr price tag.



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the author

Alicia Lalicon is a junior at The College of New Jersey, pursuing a Psychology major with a Women’s and Gender Studies minor. When she’s not reading about mental health and feminist ideas, she proudly enjoys dancing across bamboo sticks as the secretary of Barkada (TCNJ’s Filipino club). Her life philosophy is to always strive for improvement: physically, mentally, and intellectually. Her life motto is “You don’t owe anyone any emotions or reactions.” You can find her being seemingly cold-hearted on Twitter, reblogging black clothes and food on Tumblr, and reading intently behind a book or laptop screen.

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